Perfect Picture Book Friday/ Basket Moon

Hi Friends!

Happy New Year! Are you all recovered? Are you all fresh and do you have new resolve for the coming year? I do. I for one am going to sit my butt down and write first thing in the morning for a couple of hours. Before social media or blogging or anything.  I’ve got projects I want to work on and I’m taking a class, starting  Jan. 16th .   And I am getting prepared with some reading and writing. It’s an online class that meets twice a week with homework assigned.  So you’ll have to excuse me if I’m not right here where you want me. Or commenting as frequently on Facebook posts or blogs. This takes precedence. I hope you’ll understand. My number one New Years Resolution is to write more. 

How about you? What are your resolutions? And goals?

Here are a few links I hope you find helpful as a gift to you.

http://turbomonkeytales.blogspot.com/2012/12/time-to-say-goodbye-to-old-manuscript.html?show For when to  know to say goodbye to the old loved manuscript.  

Here’s my favorite. It’s got all the best articles in writing from the whole year, of 2012! Wow!

http://www.writersdigest.com/online-editor/the-19-most-popular-articles-on-writing-of-2012?et_mid=595583&rid=232945683

alt._Basket Moon.alt_book cover.Now for the newest of new PPBF! Perfect Picture Book Friday/ Basket Moon.

Hi Friends!

Title: Basket Moon

Author and Illustrator:  Mary Lyn Ray and Barbara Cooney

Published by: Little Brown and Company on 1999, fiction

Suitable for ages: K through grade two

Theme: Basket making, Fathers and sons, Mountain life, New York State, culture and diversity, westerns, character and values, acceptance of self, differences, family, fitting in, getting along, history, self acceptance, self-esteem, relationships, standing up for oneself, true fiction,

First Three Sentences: The moon was almost round. The Basket Moon. Pa would be going to Hudson. Maybe this time I could go, too

From the Jacket: A young boy grows up playing among the ash, oak, hickory, and maple trees that surround his home. He admires his father’s basket-making skills and anticipates the time when he will be allowed to join him on his monthly selling trip to the big city. But the boy is unprepared for the taunts of “hillbilly” and “bushwhacker” he encounters there.

This poetic story captures a moment when a child becomes aware that the outside world doesn’t view him or his family as he does. Embarrassed and ashamed, the boy questions his future as a basket-maker. He finds the answer in the sound of the wind blowing through those same trees around his home.

This coming-of-age story is illustrated by two-time Caldecott Medalist Barbara Cooney.

What I found out: On the back of the jacket it says some things about how the book was written in the bios for the author and illustrator. Mary Lyn Ray studied American Crafts and began to write this story when editing Legend of Taghkanic basket-making. And Barbara Cooney researched Basket Moon by traveling throughout the Taconic region of New York State and observing basket-making techniques. See! Other authors and illustrators don’t just get the book done in a jiffy. It takes time. And effort.

Why I like it: I love coming of age novels and to see a picture book written for that is amazing. As you might expect the illustrations are magnificent and tell you quite a bit about making baskets. They definitely tell another story while at the same time accenting the text. In one illustration for instance you are shown a tub with water as the coils for the bottom of the basket is made. No where in the text does it say you have to soak the wood first. The personalities of the characters are depicted clearly in the illustrations. The book is a work of art.

Resources: http://pan.intrasun.tcnj.edu/501/projects/White/LiteracyLesson.htm has discussion questions about a time the reader might have felt like the boy in the book. When they were the odd one out, maybe just moved to a different place and spoke differently than the majority of the other  kids, or maybe were embarrassed by wearing an older siblings clothing. This resource goes on to give other lessons as well. Following the story, as a class, to discuss and build a “Story Map.” Where they will talk about the setting, characters, problem, action and outcome. Then think about their predictions and discuss how accurate they were.    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YsBEv-sdEm0  for how to make a hand made basket using recycled newspapers.

As Robyn (http://robyn-campbell.blogspot.com/2012/03/perfect-picture-book-friday_16.html) says “Go check out more favorite picture books over at Susanna Leonard Hill’s house. You’ll be glad ya did.

Have a safe and lovely weekend, y’all. Xoxo”

Basket weaving

Basket weaving (Photo credit: Anduze traveller)

Do you think you will like this book? Why or why not?

As for the winner of my last contest, a copy of Henry on Fire, : there is no winner. 😦  https://clarbojahn.wordpress.com/2012/12/17/clarbojahn-presents-mmgm-authorstuart-schadt-part-two-and-a-give-away/

There were no followers that also commented. So sorry guys, to report this in this way. But maybe next time I have a contest there will be winners, huh?

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About ClaraBowmanJahn

Journal writer. Author of "Annie's Special Day" And coauthor of Edmund Pickle Chin, A Donkey Rescue Story." Proud mother and grandmother of wonderful kids. Wife of brilliant husband. Servant of two cats. Member of Pennwriters and SCBWI.
This entry was posted in Clara Bowman-Jahn, Clarike Bowman-Jahn, Course or Book Review, Perfect Picture Book Friday, social networking and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

36 Responses to Perfect Picture Book Friday/ Basket Moon

  1. Catherine Johnson says:

    Great review, Clar. Good luck with your writing resolutions.

    Like

  2. Cheryl Serra says:

    Great blog! What class are you taking? Basket Moon looks delightful. I’m forwarding your blog to a friend of mine who just got her MLS. Happy New Year! Cheryl

    ________________________________

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    • clarbojahn says:

      Thanks, Cheryl. I hope your friend goes to the main link at Perfect Picture Books on Susanna Leonard’s Hill’s blog. We need librarians to learn about this resource!

      Happy New Year to you, too! 🙂

      Like

  3. henryonfire says:

    Basket Moon sounds great. It sounds like she really took time to live into the culture and the experience. I moved from a small working class community to the Houston Suburbs. When I was 12. I felt very out of place.

    Like

    • clarbojahn says:

      Yes, the author already knew a lot about basket making when she wrote this book and the illustrator took a trip to the Hudson.

      I know what you mean about feeling out of place. When I did a term of service for VISTA I had major culture shock. Just like when I immigrated from Holland to America. It takes you back. 🙂

      Like

  4. I have always been intrigued with the mountain people and their lifestyle. This is one topic you rarely find in children’s books. Thanks for sharing it, Clare, and kudos for you…writing is paramount! I haven’t had a very good start this year…

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  5. The mountain people and their lifestyle intrigue me…thanks for sharing this little written about topic. And kudos to you for writing more in the new year! I’m off to a bad start…

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    • clarbojahn says:

      I”ve been good so far but this morning was bad. I got sent in all kinds of directions. Tomorrow is another day, I say. 🙂

      Yes, this book is full of that mountain culture. You’re sure to like it. 🙂

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  6. Rosi says:

    Looks like a terrific book. Thanks for the review and thanks for the links.

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  7. Have always been interested in the music and artistic abilities, and the lifestyle of mountain people. Never thought about the “hillbilly” and “bushwhacker” being associated with mountaineers of NY — always thought associated those names with the Appalachian mountains. Lovely review. I love historical fiction and this one has two themes running through it. Great messages.

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    • clarbojahn says:

      Thanks, Patricia, Yes, the two themes of making baskets and the one of coming of age. 🙂

      Yes, same here, Patricia. I always thought of hill billies as the Appalachian mountains people’s fare. Shows how a TV program can sell our sights short doesn’t it?

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  8. this looks like a beautiful book. We’re in to tales of crafting here. This book looks especially intriguing. Thanks for sharing!

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  9. First of all, Happy New Year, Clar! I know it will be a great one of writing for all of us!
    Second, congrats on your goals of writing more…I, too, have committed to this…with great resolve.:)
    Third..what an amazing PPBF you have picked…I love the father/son theme…as well as learning to deal with bullies/teasing…I will definitely try to find a copy of this book. Your resource/activity list is wonderful, Clar. Thank you for putting so much time in to research it.
    I’m only sad about two things…I’m in Chicago visiting with my son (not sad about that) and I can’t seem to access my wordpress account to write my blog so I will have to miss posting a PPBF book and his browser doesn’t allow me to comment on Susanna’s post. And, I can’t believe NO ONE who followed you entered your contest with a comment…I think it was a really busy time for everyone…we will do better next time.:)

    Like

    • clarbojahn says:

      Lol,, Oh my!
      There’s so much going on for you. I can feel for you.

      Thanks for the comments on my selection. You’ll surely like it. 🙂

      I’ve been good today with my writing goals. It’s just that I need permission to write about this topic that I already have put so much time into. Will tell more in an email. 🙂

      Good luck getting your computer access back and have fun with your family. 🙂

      Like

  10. This book sounds and looks lovely, Clar! And I can’t believe I’ve never seen it before since I live in the Hudson Valley! I’m going to have to march right out and find a copy to read!!! I love the title – so pretty! Thanks so much for sharing! And I’m sorry your contest didn’t get a winner, but you’re right… maybe next time 🙂

    Like

    • clarbojahn says:

      I know you’ll love Basket Moon when you get a copy to read. It’s the best kind of picture book. Warm and fuzzy and educational.

      Yeah, next time. lol.. 🙂 Christmas was busy for all. 🙂

      Like

  11. This sounds like an amazing story, Clar. And I’m right with you on the writing courses. I’m taking a class right now too.

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  12. A Barbara Cooney book? I’m in!

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  13. On the west coast of Canada, where I live, the First Nations people wove beautiful baskets from part of cedar bark. When we have an elder come to show us local basket weaving, it will be good to also read Basket Moon to see how basket weaving is part of a different culture. thanks

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  14. Very interesting book. Obviously a great book for showing how leaving text out allows the illustrations show and move the story on. Congrats on a wonderful review, Clar.

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  15. A coming of age picture book intrigues me for sure. Thanks for bringing it to my attention, Clar.

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  16. Widdershins says:

    ‘Must write more’ is the bestest of writerly resolutions ever!

    Like

  17. lhsittig@verizon.net says:

    Love your blog Clar!  Barbara Cooney has always been a favorite of mine.L:)   

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  18. I love the cover! This sounds like a very interesting story! I have to put it on my TBR list. 🙂

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  19. Judith says:

    to write ya gotta show up…that’s my resolution too. Best of luck to you this year…

    Like

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