Third Campaigner Challenge of the Author Platform Builder

Sunrise over beach at ocean by CubaGallary/flickr

Sunrise over beach at ocean

Growing Up is Hard to Do.

As a woman and their mother, I had always held the prerogative when it came to decisions about the boys. Their father hadn’t the energy or cared to give them much attention. Now, standing on the beach, I was bored with it. Tears spilled over and crashed down my cheeks telling me I had reached the depths of despair. I had hoped that by now they wouldn’t need all that synbatec, wastopaneer and tacise. How long would the pain go on? The swamp behind me smelled bad, like a carcass had died and rotted. I started walking along the beach, thinking. The ocean had always been a place where I felt close to God. The sun and sky, bigger than life, reminded me of how insignificant I was.

The dawn, brilliant pink and orange rays shining across the sky, made the bitter taste of my medicine almost sweet. The magnificence of the sunrise made me realize I was indispensable. I started to feel some comfort in the scene before me. I almost swallowed the last of the water in my bottle and sat down in the sand, feeling the cool water of the ocean with my hands as I heard the waves crash on the surf. The salt spray smelled fresh and clean. I remembered other visits to the beach when the boys were younger and needed me even more. I thought about how soon they’d be on their own and wouldn’t need me at all. I remembered toddlers running and giggling, eager smiling faces looking into mine. The sun peeked out. At the last minute I spit the bitter medicine out as I realized that I wanted to live.

That is the end of my story. Here is what Rachael Harrie of the author platform building campaign said.

Now for the Challenge (and please note the word count change!):

Write a blog post in 300 words or less, excluding the title. The post can be in any format, whether flash fiction, non-fiction, humorous blog musings, poem, etc. The blog post shouldshow:

  • that it’s morning, 
  • that a man or a woman (or both) is at the beach
  • that the MC (main character) is bored
  • that something stinks behind where he/she is sitting
  • that something surprising happens.

Just for fun, see if you can involve all five senses AND include these random words: “synbatec,” “wastopaneer,” and “tacise.”   (NB. these words are completely made up and are not intended to have any meaning other than the one you give them).

I gave the imaginary words connotations to mean time, love, consideration, compassion, understanding and all other characteristics needed for a good mother that provides for the needs of her children. It has 286 words and involves all the five senses as she suggested. 

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About ClaraBowmanJahn

Journal writer. Author of "Annie's Special Day" And coauthor of Edmund Pickle Chin, A Donkey Rescue Story." Proud mother and grandmother of wonderful kids. Wife of brilliant husband. Servant of two cats. Member of Pennwriters and SCBWI.
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36 Responses to Third Campaigner Challenge of the Author Platform Builder

  1. suzicate says:

    great job on that challenge!

    Like

  2. Mel Fowler says:

    Children really are worth living for. Great story!

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  3. I enjoyed this entry very much. Great job!

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  4. Wow, didn’t expect the ending. Thought the bitter pill, tasting almost sweet was a metaphor at first. Very different and compelling. – Patricia

    Like

    • clarbojahn says:

      Thanks, Patricia. Wish I had gotten it together for a metaphor. I am meeting so many good writers and reading so many good stories. If you have time go to Rachael’s blog and read some of them. I don’t hold a candle.

      Like

  5. Jessica says:

    Wow I loved it. Very sad, but I really enjoyed reading it. I couldn’t stop reading when I started. Wonderful take on the challenge 🙂

    I’m entry #5

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  6. Lovely descriptions of the sunrise, and so sad. Glad she spit the poison out. Great job.

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  7. K.T. Hanna says:

    Ooo, I got a shiver as I read the last line. Beautifully revealed, I wasn’t expecting it at all. Great descriptions – very vivid imagery. Lovely job.

    Like

  8. Nice job and a happy ending besides. Mine is #56

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  9. Alynza says:

    Lovely descriptions and beautiful yet heartbreaking story. For her to feel so melancholy and then realize she wants to live, just breathless. Great job 🙂

    Like

  10. Susanna says:

    Wow! Great job on the challenge, Clar!

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  11. That’s an effective entry to write. Loved how you described the pill. 🙂

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  12. Wow, so glad she chose life! Loved the description *sniffles* as it reminds me of me & my girls. 😉

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  13. I loved this! It was absolutely riveting. What creative use of the words 🙂

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  14. Jen says:

    This is very powerful stuff. I loved the description of the toddlers, just beautiful.
    Mine is #25.

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  15. Pseu says:

    so difficult to do the challenge, I’m sure. ‘Showing’ not ‘telling’ is key in effective writing

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  16. clarbojahn says:

    I agree. The original post that ran the contest called this “showing ‘ and not ‘telling”. Including the five senses were key in showing not telling. One can’t describe life through the senses by telling I don’t think.
    Thanks for stopping by. Your comment is appreciated and welcome. 🙂

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  17. Very compelling read,Clar- jam-packed with sensory details that kept me right in the scene with you. Lots of universal appeal for any mother.You had me hooked. Great job!

    Like

  18. Tia Bach says:

    We must have been in similar places when taking on this challenge… I, too, had pills. I’m just getting around now to see everyone’s posts. This was a hard one, and you did really well. Check out mine, #118, if you get a chance.

    Like

  19. Sana Quijada says:

    Growing up IS scary. Over and over again

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    • clarbojahn says:

      Yes, and It’s so true all of us must do it again and again as you say. I’m sure this story resonated with you and the patients you come in contact with.

      Like

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